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News archive for February, 2013


chem.info

February 22, 2013 by

The Automation Element of Re-Shoring posted by Chem.Info

“Automation GT is a leader in business process analysis, system commissioning, user training and ongoing support”, state Chem.info in a recent article.

“There are the typical reasons that a manufacturer considers re-shoring, which Grant says circle around “labor cost and conditions, compliance, intellectual property and time to market.” With labor costs in China rapidly rising, more companies are starting to realize that the total cost of ownership of a given product is not quite as compelling for the off-shore side. The total cost of ownership equation now includes time in freight, which can swing wildly due to delays and weather conditions. Add in unfavorable tax-and-duty situations, and the price outlook gets even worse.

Grant says that many manufacturers have left themselves open to being affected by impossible-to-predict weather conditions, such as the recent Hurricane Sandy, which struck the East Coast with devastating effect in October 2012. The longer the supply chain from point of manufacturing to point of sale, the risk increases dramatically. He says, “One customer recently missed a key market opportunity due to their product sitting on a container ship waiting for east coast ports to re-open.”

While no amount of re-shoring can guarantee that a company’s operations will be free from similar disasters, it does significantly lower the barrier to finding a workaround that will get product where it needs to be to keep customers happy. With everything put together, Grant states, “From a financial and a logistical perspective, automated production in the U.S. just makes sense.”

Read the full article on Chem.info

Capture3

February 20, 2013 by

Automation GT is “at the forefront of the ‘re-shoring’ trend” according to Manufacturing.net

According to a recent article by Manufacturing.net, Automation GT is “at the forefront of the re-shoring trend that has been sweeping the American manufacturing landscape”. President & CEO of Automation GT, Simon Grant, shares his comments with editor Joel Hans on how automation is bringing production lines back to the United States and what it means for the economy and jobs in the U.S. Read the full story here.

Automation GT, an automation design-and-manufacturing firm based out of Escondido, Calif., is at the forefront of the “re-shoring” trend that has been sweeping the American manufacturing landscape. The company, which has deployed automation solutions in a handful of industries — aerospace, automotive, pharmaceutical and medical devices, to name a few — has seen some of its largest clients put serious thought into the business case of bringing work back to America.

Simon Grant, Automation GT’s CEO and President, says the re-shoring issue has become more prevalent in during early and mid-2012. Even though most of the industry has been aware of the trend, Grant says only recently has there been a “re-awakening” of the capital budgets among his company’s Fortune 100 customers. And while a post-Great Recession economy might give major corporations more flexibility in which to consider the prospect of bringing jobs back to America, it’s not the only reason to pursue the business case

There are the typical reasons that a manufacturer considers re-shoring, which Grant says circle around “labor cost and conditions, compliance, intellectual property and time to market.” With labor costs in China rapidly rising, more companies are starting to realize that the total cost of ownership of a given product is not quite as compelling for the off-shore side. The total cost of ownership equation now includes time in freight, which can swing wildly due to delays and weather conditions. Add in unfavorable tax-and-duty situations, and the price outlook ge1ts even worse.

Grant says that many manufacturers have left themselves open to being affected by impossible-to-predict weather conditions, such as the recent Hurricane Sandy, which struck the East Coast with devastating effect in October 2012. The longer the supply chain from point of manufacturing to point of sale, the risk increases dramatically. He says, “One customer recently missed a key market opportunity due to their product sitting on a container ship waiting for east coast ports to re-open.”

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control_design_paul_simmons

February 19, 2013 by

Building Machines to Automate a Process

Paul Simmons, our customer service technician, is featured on Control Design

“As a machine builder that does 80–90% of its business in one-off custom projects, we’re accustomed to working closely with manufacturers to build an automation solution for the products they make. They have a goal and a proven process. They need us to build a machine to automate that process.

For a recent customer, however, the process was less refined from the start, so we got involved at a deeper level. I worked very closely with the process engineers and chemical engineers to develop the process, and we were able to create a very successful machine implementation to improve automation.

The assembly system was needed for high-end custom eyeglass lenses. The lenses are made of three layers of parts: the base, the lens polymer, and the cap. The manufacturer required an automated system that would begin by placing a layer of adhesive on the outside of the base. Once the adhesive was in place, the cap was to be placed on top, creating an open chamber between the base and the cap. After the adhesive was cured with a UV light, a lens polymer was injected into the open chamber.”

Read more on Control Design.